What can countries in the UK learn from each other?

What can countries in the UK learn from each other?

Agnes

The first meeting of the new VERDe network was held in Edinburgh on Monday 25 January 2016

Download the report from the meeting at the bottom of this page

What can countries in the UK learn from each other about values, equalities, and rights in policy and practice affecting people with dementia?

Monday 25 January 2016

University of Edinburgh, John McIntyre Centre 

Welcome and overview of Purpose of VERDe
Co-chairs: Toby Williamson (Mental Health Foundation) & Agnes Houston (Scottish Dementia Working Group)

The Dementia Without Walls programme – Philly Hare, Joseph Rowntree Foundation

Funding to create better lives through projects, policy and practice –
Anna Buchanan, Life Changes Trust
Download presentation as PDF AnnaBuchanan_VERDe presentation_Jan2016

Mental Health Foundation programmes: European Dementia Friendly Communities; Dementia and Disability Rights Report; & the Dementia “Truth-telling” Inquiry – Toby Williamson (Mental Health Foundation)

The Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project (DEEP) – Steve Milton, Innovations in Dementia
Download presentation as PDF SteveMilton_VERDePresentation_Jan2016

Key principles of Scottish dementia policy development – Michelle Miller, National Improvement Lead, Focus on Dementia Programme, Scottish Government
Download presentation as PDF MichelleMiller_VERDePresentation_Jan2016

Advancing a human rights based approach in Scotland – Jim Pearson, Director of Policy & Research, Alzheimer’s Scotland
Download presentation as PDF JimPearson_VERDePresentation_Jan2016

Scottish Charter of Rights for People with Dementia and their Carers – Irene Oldfather (Health and Social Care Alliance)
Download presentation as PDF IreneOldfather_VERDe presentation_Jan2016

Roundtable discussions and feedback: “How can VERDe influence and enhance dementia policy and practice in Scotland and the UK?”

 

 

Documents

  • What can countries in the UK learn from each other about values, equalities, and rights in policy and practice affecting people with dementia? – Report of the first VERDe meeting

    A theme from the day was that it’s all very well talking about rights and producing policies, documents, words using rights-based approaches but how do they actually get turned into something positive and transformative in the lives of people with dementia (the “grittiness of rights” as one participant put it)? Several examples were given of how health and social care services often seem unaware of rights when providing care and support, and people with dementia and carers were frequently too busy or overwhelmed with trying to sort out the basics to have time to think in terms of rights.

    These challenges are for VERDE to communicate and publicise, but also address in subsequent events. A focus on rights in practice through the proper involvement of people with dementia and carers, the role of advocacy, engagement with excluded or disadvantaged groups such as women and Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, and collecting and sharing examples from across the UK, are some of the ways these challenges will be met.

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