Venus, Mars and Dementia – Gender perspectives on dementia

Venus, Mars and Dementia – Gender perspectives on dementia

Women with dementia meeting in York in 2015

The second meeting of the VERDe network was held in London on 2 June 2016. Read the report from the meeting.

Two thirds of people with dementia are women. Caring is often seen is often seen as the role of women. Differences like these can also have implications for how men cope with dementia. But dementia is not often considered in terms of gender. This may mean that services for people with dementia do not take into account these important differences. What are the challenges for women and men affected by dementia, for practitioners, services and policy makers? How can a focus on rights and equalities help with this?

Download the report from the meeting: VERDe 2 Report

The event was co-chaired by Joy Watson, Dementia Champion, and Toby Williamson from the Mental Health Foundation.

Download some of the presentations as PDF files:

Documents

  • Venus, Mars and Dementia: Gender perspectives on dementia – report from the 2nd VERDe meeting

    Two thirds of people with dementia are women. Caring is often seen as the role of women. Differences like these can also have implications for how men cope with dementia. But dementia is not often considered in terms of gender. This may mean that services for people with dementia do not take into account these important differences. What are the challenges for women and men affected by dementia, for practitioners, services and policy makers? How can a focus on equalities help with this?
    The second meeting of the Values, Equalities, Rights and Dementia network (VERDe) in London on the 2 June 2016 focused on these issues.

    This is the report from that meeting.

  • Women’s experiences of dementia – booklet

    This booklet aims to give an impression of the effects of dementia on women – in their own words.

  • Dementia through the eyes of women

    Dementia disproportionately affects women, but their experiences and voices are missing from research and literature. This project aimed to inspire people to think differently about women and dementia by using stories and reflections from individual women to inform the debate in a unique, inspiring and insightful way.