“Poor quality care ought be recognised as a form of abuse”

“Poor quality care ought be recognised as a form of abuse”

“When you walk into a care home, it’s full of warmth, activities, and interaction. But between these good examples and the worst examples, which often dominate the headlines, is the forgotten scandal of people with dementia. They’re failed and left, living a life than can only be described as okay. We know there a variable standards of care in care homes. Owners and staff do not have the specific skills and knowledge required to understand the particular needs of people with dementia. So in many cases, services for people with dementia are nonexistent.

People with dementia face widespread discrimination for a number of reasons. There remains a significant misunderstanding and a stigma attached to dementia that manifests itself in widespread discriminatory attitudes.

Abuses and serious infringement of our human rights have serious impact on our quality of life. Poor quality care in itself is a breach of human rights act for people with dementia. Therefore, poor quality care ought be recognised as a form of abuse. The wide-spread over-prescription of anti-psyotic drugs to treat the behavioural symptoms of dementia is a serious breach of these rights. Anti-psychotic drugs have serious risks for people with dementia, including excessive sedation, exhilarated cognitive decline, and increased mortality.”

Tommy Dunne
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